The Straits of Galahesh

This novel is the sequel to what I considered to be the 2011 speculative fiction debut of the year, The Winds of Khalakovo (Canada, USA, Europe).Bradley P. Beaulieu made quite an impression on me with his first book, and thus I had rather high expectations for The Straits of Galahesh.

After showing so much potential, I wanted to know if the author could bring this series to another level with the second volume. Well, this sequel delivers on all fronts and is even better than its predecessor! Indeed, Beaulieu managed to iron out most of the kinks that were the shortcomings of The Winds of Khalakovo. In the end, The Straits of Galahesh is an even more ambitious project, one that makes for a wonderful reading experience!

Here's the blurb:

West of the Grand Duchy of Anuskaya lies the Empire of Yrstanla, the Motherland. The Empire has lived at peace with Anuskaya for generations, but with political turmoil brewing and the wasting disease still rampant, opportunists from the mainland have begun to set their sights on the Grand Duchy, seeking to expand their empire. 

Five years have passed since Prince Nikandr, heir to the scepter of Khalakovo, was tasked with finding Nasim, the child prodigy behind a deadly summoning that led to a grand clash between the armies of man and elder elemental spirits. Today, that boy has grown into a young man driven to understand his past - and the darkness from which Nikandr awakened him. Nikandr's lover, Atiana, has become a Matra, casting her spirit forth to explore, influence, and protect the Grand Duchy. But when the Al-Aqim, long thought lost to the past, return to the islands and threaten to bring about indaraqiram - a change that means certain destruction for both the Landed and the Landless - bitter enemies must become allies and stand against their horrific plans. 

From Bradley P. Beaulieu, author of the critically acclaimed debut novel The Winds of Khalakovo, comes Book Two of The Lays of Anuskaya, The Straits of Galahesh.

The worldbuilding is terrific. Once more, very Russian and/or Eastern European in style and tone, Beaulieu prefers to go for something different than the clichéd European medieval environment that gives this book its distinctive vibe and flavor. The author elaborates a lot more than he did in his debut, and what was just a hint of hidden depth in The Winds of Khalakovo is finally revealed in full. I liked how we learned more about the Motherland and the threats it's facing, but also the way it's tied to the islands of the Grand Duchy. Moreover, the revelations regarding the Al-Aqim, the rifts, the peace-loving Aramahn, the violent sect of the Maharraht, the mysterious Matri, and the entire magic system were fascinating.

People have asked me what authors Bradley P. Beaulieu reminded me of, and it's a hard question to answer. But in many ways, he appears to be a mix of Steven Erikson and L. E. Modesitt, jr. That's a weird hybrid, I know. But it's the only thing I could come up with. À la Erikson, Beaulieu likes to throw his readers into the heart of the tale without offering much in the way of information. In the first volume, this often resulted in an occasional lack of clarity that left readers wondering what the heck was taking place. Drawing on the material from The Winds of Khalakovo, Beaulieu does it less often in this sequel. But as is the case with Steven Erikson, sometimes you just need to buckle up and be taken along for the ride, hoping that an explanation will be provided down the line.

In terms of characterization and magic system, his approach is very similar to that of L. E. Modesitt, jr. Beaulieu's cast of characters may not be the most flamboyant bunch of people. And yet, for the most part they are solid, genuine, and three-dimensional men and women that remain true to themselves. The same thing goes for the magic, which is consistent and must follow strict rules that make sense. So far, there hasn't been any Deus ex machina moments where magic is concerned. Again, I feel that too little is known about everything that has to do with magic in The Lays of Anuskaya. But instead of finding this off-putting, my curiosity is such that I'm just dying to learn more and see what will occur next.

As was the case with its predecessor, the layered characterization in The Straits of Galahesh was my favorite facet of this novel. The five-year gap between both installments allowed Beaulieu to showcase just how brilliant his character development can be. Nikandr, Atiana, and Nasim are the viewpoint protagonists in this second volume. The structure of the novel is such that each viewpoint always gets two or three chapters at a time, which creates a neat balance between them. Add to that a supporting cast of genuine and interesting men and women, and once again you have a work that really captures your imagination. Special kudos to Beaulieu for letting readers learn more about Soroush and realize that there is much more to him than just being a fundamentalist terrorist leader. All in all, the characterization is top notch.

In addition, I'm not sure Bradley P. Beaulieu sat down and had a beer with George R. R. Martin at a convention in between books, but it looks as though he became fond of creating living and breathing protagonists that readers care about, only to kill them off when you least expect it. Indeed, The Straits of Galahesh features a body count that both GRRM and Joe Abercrombie would approve of. At one point I was left wondering who the hell would be left to make it to the third volume!

In terms of rhythm, there were a few rough spots here and there, the same as in The Winds of Khalakovo. You can see that the author is laying a lot of groundwork for what will follow, but the pace is rarely an issue. In any case, Beaulieu's eye for details and his evocative narrative creates an imagery that never failed to amaze me. There are surprises and shocking moments aplenty throughout the book, making this one extremely unpredictable novel to read.

Dark, ambitious, complex, populated with a great cast of characters that leap off the pages, The Straits of Galahesh is just what the doctor ordered if you are looking for a quality read that's different from everything else on the market today. The Winds of Khalakovo turned out to be one of the very best SFF works of 2011. Somehow, Bradley P. Beaulieu has raised the bar even higher for this sequel, making The Straits of Galahesh a "must read" speculative fiction title for 2012.

Two thumbs way, way up! Do yourself a favor and give Beaulieu's series a shot. You'll thank me. . .

Highly recommended.

The final verdict: 8.5/10

For more info about this title: Canada, USA, Europe.

Game of Thrones, Season 2: Episode 6 preview

I love Sunday nights! =)

More inexpensive ebook goodies!

You can now download Joe Haldeman's classic, The Forever War, for only 4.99$ here.

Here's the blurb:


The Forever War is a science fiction classic that chronicles the life of William Mandella. Due to the time distortion associated with deep space travel, he is present during both the first and the last battle of a thousand year old conflict with the alien Taurans.

A masterpiece of not just science fiction, The Forever War illustrates the futility of all wars and their effect on the human soul.

The Forever War won all major science fiction awards including the Hugo, Nebula and Locus. Ridley Scott, director of Blade Runner and Alien, is currently adapting this classic for film.

This is the author's preferred version and includes a foreword by John Scalzi, author of Old Man's War.

Prometheus International Trailer

Looks awesome!

This week's New York Times bestsellers (April 23rd)

In hardcover:

Christopher Moore’s Sacré Bleu: A Comedy d'Art is down three spots, finishing the week at number 6.

George R. R. Martin's A Dance With Dragons is up three positions, ending the week at number 10. For more info about this title: Canada, USA, Europe.

Stephen King's 11/22/63 is up eight positions, ending the week at number 20. For more info about this title: Canada, USA, Europe.

Seth Grahame-Smith’s Unholy Night debuts at number 21.

Anne Rice's The Wolf Gift is up two spots, finishing the week at number 24. For more info about this title: Canada, USA, Europe.

In paperback:

George R. R. Martin's A Game of Thrones maintains its position at number 4.

Seth Grahame-Smith's Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter maintains its position at number 6 (trade paperback).

Seth Grahame-Smith's Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter maintains its position at number 7.

George R. R. Martin's A Game of Thrones maintains its position at number 9 (trade paperback).

George R. R. Martin's A Clash of Kings is down one position, finishing the week at number 10.

Charlaine Harris' Dead Reckoning is up two spots, finishing the week at number 12.

George R. R. Martin's A Storms of Swords is down one position, ending the week at number 14.

George R. R. Martin's A Feast for Crows is up one position, ending the week at number 21.

Max Brooks' World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War is down five spots, finishing the week at number 33 (trade paperback).

George R. R. Martin's A Feast for Crows returns at number 34 (trade paperback).

George R. R. Martin's A Clash of Kings is down four spots, finishing the week at number 35 (trade paperback).

Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game returns at number 35.

Win a copy of THE WEIRD, edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer

Thanks to the generosity of the folks at Tor Books, I have a copy of The Weird: A Compendium of Strange and Dark Stories, edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer, up for grabs. Weighing in at 1152 pages, it's an enormous anthology featuring an all-star cast of contributors. For more info about this title: Canada, USA, Europe.

Here's the blurb:

From Lovecraft to Borges to Gaiman, a century of intrepid literary experimentation has created a corpus of dark and strange stories that transcend all known genre boundaries. Together these stories form The Weird, and amongst its practitioners number some of the greatest names in twentieth and twenty-first century literature.

Exotic and esoteric, The Weird plunges you into dark domains and brings you face to face with surreal monstrosities. You won't find any elves or wizards here...but you will find the biggest, boldest, and downright most peculiar stories from the last hundred years bound together in the biggest Weird collection ever assembled.

The Weird features an all-star cast of authors, from literary legends to international bestsellers to Booker prize winners: 110 stories by authors including William Gibson, George RR Martin, Stephen King, Angela Carter, Kelly Link, Franz Kafka, China Miéville, Clive Barker, Haruki Murakami, M.R. James, Neil Gaiman, Mervyn Peake, and Michael Chabon.

The rules are the same as usual. You need to send an email at reviews@(no-spam) with the header "WEIRD." Remember to remove the "no spam" thingy.

Second, your email must contain your full mailing address (that's snail mail!), otherwise your message will be deleted.

Lastly, multiple entries will disqualify whoever sends them. And please include your screen name and the message boards that you frequent using it, if you do hang out on a particular MB.

Good luck to all the participants!

Win a copy of George R. R. Washington's A GAME OF GROANS

I'm giving away my copy of George R. R. Washington's A Game of Groans, an ASOIAF parody. For more info about this title: Canada, USA, Europe.

Here's the blurb:

‘There was a bloodied knife on Allbran’s bed. Lady Gateway Barker knew what she had to do; what all the royals in Summerseve did when somebody tried to kill a member of their family: gather up a bunch of people and horses, and go from one place to another.’ 

In the land of the Eight (or was it Six?) Kingdoms – where seasons can last decades and comparisons to Tolkien a lifetime – trouble is brewing. For the Barkers of Summerseve, times are about to get as tough as the pronunciation of ‘Daenerys Targaryen’. 

From this world of outdoor fornication with horse-people (and indoor fornication with blood relatives) comes an epic story of novella proportions as the Barkers, their BFFs, and their enemies strive to star in that funniest of concepts: a parody of George R. R. Martin’s A Game of Thrones.

The rules are the same as usual. You need to send an email at reviews@(no-spam) with the header "GROANS." Remember to remove the "no spam" thingy.

Second, your email must contain your full mailing address (that's snail mail!), otherwise your message will be deleted.

Lastly, multiple entries will disqualify whoever sends them. And please include your screen name and the message boards that you frequent using it, if you do hang out on a particular MB.

Good luck to all the participants!

Extract from Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson's A MEMORY OF LIGHT just posted the opening section of the prologue of A Memory of Light.

The extract was originally presented by Harriet McDougal at JordanCon 2012 this past weekend. You can read the excerpt here.

 The full prologue will be available at the end of 2012. . .

I commend this one to your attention. . .

I still have a ways to go, but so far I'm loving Kameron Hurley's God's War (Canada, USA, Europe). You might want to check it out. . .

Here's the blurb:

Nyx had already been to hell. One prayer more or less wouldn't make any difference...

On a ravaged, contaminated world, a centuries-old holy war rages, fought by a bloody mix of mercenaries, magicians, and conscripted soldiers. Though the origins of the war are shady and complex, there's one thing everybody agrees on--

There's not a chance in hell of ending it.

Nyx is a former government assassin who makes a living cutting off heads for cash. But when a dubious deal between her government and an alien gene pirate goes bad, Nyx's ugly past makes her the top pick for a covert recovery. The head they want her to bring home could end the war--but at what price?

The world is about to find out

And here's the trailer:

Feminist Speculative Fiction Anthology

Not sure if there would be a lot of interest for such a project, but Ann and Jeff VanderMeer are raising funds for a feminist speculative fiction anthology.

This from

This project will fund a speculative fiction (science fiction, fantasy, & horror) anthology devoted to feminist themes. Editing the book will be Hugo Award winner Ann VanderMeer and World Fantasy Award winner Jeff VanderMeer. Together respected and successful team has edited such anthologies Steampunk Reloaded, The New Weird, Best American Fantasy, and, most recently, The Weird Compendium, a 750,000-word, 100-year overview of weird fiction including writers from over 20 countries.

 Release of the book will be a co-publishing arrangement with PM Press, an independent press devoted to provocative and engaging books, CDs, and DVDs via any means available, including distribution to the book trade (bookstores, libraries, etc.).

 The anthology will emphasize women's speculative fiction from the mid-1970s onward, looking to explore women's rights as well as gender/race/class/etc. from as many perspectives as possible. The contributors are not yet established so we hesitate to name names, but rights to reprint stories from Ursula K. Le Guin, Octavia E. Butler, Joanna Russ, and James Tiptree Jr. would be sought in addition to a wealth of newer voices in the field. Ann and Jeff consider the anthology "to be an opportunity to contribute to the existing conversation about feminist speculative fiction, a conversation that has taken many forms over the years and has a long and established history." Funding covers the editors' fee, contributor fees/advances, book design, printing, as much advertising and promotion as possible. To help the project get off the ground the editors have agreed to take a small honorarium as their fee, with no share of royalties.

This project will only see the light if at least $12,000 are pledged by Thursday, May 31st, 2012.

It will be interesting to see if the editors can raise enough funds to put this anthology into production. . .

Star Wars Identities

Went to the Star Wars Identities exhibition this afternoon and it's a very cool experience for fans of the two trilogies.

Here's the blurb:


 200 original costumes, props, models, and pieces of artwork are yours to discover up close at STAR WARS™ Identities. There’s R2-D2, Han Solo’s Millennium Falcon and Anakin’s full-sized Podracer. Other favourites, like Yoda, Chewbacca, Boba Fett, Princess Leia, stormtroopers, and Darth Vader, are also on display. As are many more treasures, including dozens of objects being exhibited for the first time. 

Breathtaking face-to-face encounters with dozens of character costumes and props, as well as original artwork and models, will take you behind the scenes in the movie-making process.

 The collection spans all six Star Wars movies as well as the ongoing television series Star Wars: The Clone Wars™.

There's a lot of interactive stuff and you get to create your own Star Wars character. Still, at 23$ a ticket, it's not cheap. But it brought back so many wonderful memories from my childhood that it was money well invested!

You can learn more about the exhibition by visiting its official website.

May the Force be with you. Always.

Here's the teaser trailer:

Guest Blog: Mark Teppo

The Mongoliad is a collaborative effort from Neal Stephenson, Greg Bear, Mark Teppo, and a few other authors. Intrigued by the project, I invited Teppo to tell us a bit more about it! For more info about this title: Canada, USA, Europe.

Here's the blurb:

The first novel to be released in The Foreworld Saga, The Mongoliad: Book One, is an epic-within-an-epic, taking place in 13th century. In it, a small band of warriors and mystics raise their swords to save Europe from a bloodthirsty Mongol invasion. Inspired by their leader (an elder of an order of warrior monks), they embark on a perilous journey and uncover the history of hidden knowledge and conflict among powerful secret societies that had been shaping world events for millennia.

But the saga reaches the modern world via a circuitous route. In the late 19th century, Sir Richard F. Burton, an expert on exotic languages and historical swordsmanship, is approached by a mysterious group of English martial arts aficionados about translating a collection of long-lost manuscripts. Burton dies before his work is finished, and his efforts were thought lost until recently rediscovered by a team of amateur archaeologists in the ruins of a mansion in Trieste, Italy. From this collection of arcana, the incredible tale of The Mongoliad was recreated.

Full of high adventure, unforgettable characters, and unflinching battle scenes, The Mongoliad ignites a dangerous quest where willpower and blades are tested and the scope of world-building is redefined

You can watch trailer with Neal Stephenson here.


 One of the comments I hear regularly when I tell people about The Mongoliad is "Oh, well, I don't read epic fantasy." They don't mean to be dismissive about it; they're just pointing out that, in all likelihood, they've already checked out of this conversation and the rest is simply going to be me talking to them while they think about butterflies or chocolate covered bonbons or the like. I'd don't really want to be dismissive in return, because, really, "epic" and "fantasy" are two words that mean a lot more than the sort of thing that Tolkien wrote.

Here's the thing: I understand labels. I understand genre marketing. I get that people like to put things in neat little boxes so that they know how to approach them. I also started off my career writing "urban fantasy" books that don't have werewolves, vampires, or the undead in them. I call the Codex books "occult noir" and no one understands what I'm saying; I say "urban fantasy" and we have, at least, a general starting point.

For a moment, then, let's consider this claim that The Mongoliad is an epic fantasy. What's epic about it is the amount of research we did. We wanted to write a Western martial arts adventure story, one that was true to the actual fighting techniques of the time. Fighting techniques that are, only now, being rediscovered and taught in martial arts schools around the world. You know what? There's a lot more to fighting with a sword than simply hitting the other guy first.

And as we went down the rabbit hole of martial arts, we realized we couldn't short-change the rest of the story as well. So, when we talk about how Rœdwulf's bow is constructed and how he fires it, it's because we dug up copies of Roger Ascham's Toxophilus, a 16th century manual of proper construction and use of the longbow. When we talk about the composition of the forests around Legnica, it's because we sourced--as near as we could fathom--historical data from Polish naturalists who are keen on the history of their local greenery. (We also had a list of about twenty bird species that were native to the area and we would have worked them all in somehow, but, well, we had to draw the line somewhere.) The point is: we wanted to get as many of the details right as we could, because history is so much, much more fantastic than you can ever imagine.

We had a conversation once about where to file The Mongoliad. Was it alternate history? Not entirely. Was it a secret history? Somewhat. Did we make things up? Certainly. Did we stretch the truth a bit? Most definitely. Our knights, for example, use techniques that aren't entirely codified for another two hundred years (the key word here is "entirely"); their use of armor is about fifty years ahead of the rest of the Europe (they're bad-ass outliers, of course). And there are things that we make up entirely (the Binders, for instance). Oh, and the entire crypto-pagan mythology that underlies all of Foreworld?

Well, I'll argue we didn't make that up, but then again, I'm the one who has a soft spot for esoteric mystery schools.

You could argue the difference between science fiction and fantasy is the application of faith. The difference between regular fantasy and epic fantasy is then, perhaps, the amount of faith you have to bring with you when you read a story. We've written a story about medieval Europe, and guess what? They had a much, much different baseline for faith than we do now.

It's just an adventure story, really, a long-form novel that illuminated a period of history that is wonderfully rich in both its belief systems, its technologies, and its martial arts. We call our version of history Foreworld, because it is a different state of the world. How much you believe what we've written is up to you, but I can tell you that both more and less of the work is true.

In which case, maybe the best way to classify The Mongoliad is to call it an Epic Historical Fantasy.

Quote of the Day

But in this he will be disappointed, for he has been fooled like so many others--so many over the course of generations. It is the grand joke, the notion that there is free will, that one can work with a collective toward a greater good, a greater purpose. The truth is that such things can never happen on their own. They must be forced.

BRADLEY P. BEAULIEU, The Straits of Galahesh (Canada, USA, Europe)

Darrell K. Sweet's unfinished cover art for A MEMORY OF LIGHT

This is Darrell K. Sweet's unfinished cover art for Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson's A Memory of Light.

 Love him or hate him, Sweet gave The Wheel of Time its visual identity and I prefer his covers, even the atrocious ones, to the new ones Tor Books came up with.

 What can I say!?! I'm old school! ;-)

What to read next. . .

Every week, I receive random emails and messages from SFF fans requesting recommendations regarding what to read next. Most of them ask me about finished series or stand-alone novels, hopefully available in paperback format. So again, here's a list of the usual suspects:

  - The Godless World by Brian Ruckley

- Winterbirth (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Bloodheir (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Fall of Thanes (Canada, USA, Europe)

- Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn by Tad Williams

- The Dragonbone Chair (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Stone of Farewell (Canada, USA, Europe)
- To Green Angel Tower part 1 (Canada, USA, Europe)
- To Green Angel Tower part 2 (Canada, USA, Europe)

- The Gap Saga by Stephen R. Donaldson

- The Real Story (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Forbidden Knowledge (Canada, USA, Europe)
- A Dark and Hungry God Arises (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Chaos and Order (Canada, USA, Europe)
- This Day All Gods Die (Canada, USA, Europe)

- The Coldfire Trilogy by C. S. Friedman

- Black Sun Rising: Canada, USA, Europe
- When True Night Falls: Canada, USA, Europe
- Crown of Shadows: Canada, USA, Europe

- Anything by Guy Gavriel Kay

The Fionavar Tapestry

- The Summer Tree (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The Wandering Fire (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The Darkest Road (Canada, USA, Europe)

- Tigana (Canada, USA, Europe)

- A Song for Arbonne (Canada, USA, Europe)

- The Lions of Al-Rassan (Canada, USA, Europe)

The Sarantine Mosaic

- Sailing to Sarantium (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Lord of Emperors (Canada, USA, Europe)

- The Last Light of the Sun (Canada, USA, Europe)

- Beyond this Dark House (Canada, USA, Europe)

- Ysabel (Canada, USA, Europe)

- Under Heaven (Canada, USA, Europe)

- The Book of All Hours by Hal Duncan

- Vellum (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Ink (Canada, USA, Europe)

- The Cassandra Kresnov series by Joel Shepherd

- Crossover (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Breakaway (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Killswitch (Canada, USA, Europe)

- The Jump 225 Trilogy by David Louis Edelman

- Infoquake (Canada, USA, Europe)
- MultiReal (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Geosynchron (Canada, USA, Europe)

- The Black Company by Glen Cook

- Chronicles of the Black Company (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The Books of the South (Canada, USA, Europe.)
- The Return of the Black Company (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The Many Deaths of the Black Company (Canada, USA, Europe)

- Otherland by Tad Williams

- City of Golden Shadow: Canada, USA, Europe
- River of Blue Fire: Canada, USA, Europe
- Mountain of Black Glass: Canada, USA, Europe
- Sea of Silver Light: Canada, USA, Europe

- The Magisters Trilogy by C. S. Friedman

- Feast of Souls (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Wings of Wrath (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Legacy of Kings (Canada, USA, Europe)

- The Prince of Nothing by R. Scott Bakker

- The Darkness that Comes Before (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The Warrior-Prophet (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The Thousandfold Thought (Canada, USA, Europe)

- The Saga of Recluce by L. E. Modesitt, jr.

- The Magic of Recluce (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The Towers of the Sunset (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The Magic Engineer (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The Order War (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The Death of Chaos (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Fall of Angels (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The Chaos Balance (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The White Order (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Colors of Chaos (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Magi'i of Cyador (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Scion of Cyador (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Wellspring of Chaos (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Ordermaster (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Natural Ordermage (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Mage-Guard of Hamor (Canada, USA, Europe)

- The Deryni Saga by Katherine Kurtz

The Chronicles of the Deryni

- Deryni Rising (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Deryni Checkmate (Canada, USA, Europe)
- High Deryni (Canada, USA, Europe)

The Legends of Camber of Culdi

- Camber of Culdi (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Saint Camber (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Camber the Heretic (Canada, USA, Europe)

The Histories of King Kelson

- The Bishop's Heir (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The King's Justice (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The Quest for Saint Camber (Canada, USA, Europe)

The Heirs of Saint Camber

- The Harrowing of Gwynedd (Canada, USA, Europe)
- King Javan's Year (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The Bastard Prince (Canada, USA, Europe)

King Kelson's Bride (Canada, USA, Europe)

In the King's Service (Canada, USA, Europe)

Childe Morgan (Canada, USA, Europe)

Deryni Anthologies

- The Deryni Archives (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Deryni Magic (Canada, USA, Europe)
- Deryni Tales (Canada, USA, Europe)

- The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant by Stephen R. Donaldson

- Lord Foul's Bane (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The Illearth War (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The Power that Preserves (Canada, USA, Europe)

- The Wounded Land (Canada, USA, Europe)
- The One Tree (Canada, USA, Europe)
- White Gold Wielder (Canada, USA, Europe)

This should keep you guys busy for a little while. . . ;-)