Quote of the day


While my novels contain secondary fantasy elements, they aren’t primarily fantasy books and for that reason the vast majority of my readers are not exclusively fantasy readers but general fiction readers.

- TERRY GOODKIND, in a recent interview


Honestly, I wonder what it will take to make this man realize that he's been writing fantasy books from the very beginning and that his fan base consists primarily of fantasy readers.

One would think that being published by what is probably the biggest fantasy publisher in North America would also ring a bell. . . Then there are the dragon, wizards, magic, creatures, and other "secondary" fantasy elements that can be found in all of Goodkind's books.

Oh well, some things were not meant to be understood. . .

Or maybe it's simply because I'm not the sharpest tool in the shed. . .;-)

11 commentaires:

brian said...

Seems to me that whenever I visit my local bookstore, his novels are 100% of the time located in the...wait for it...FANTASY section. Might be another clue, I dunno. How's my ponytail look?

Anonymous said...

I think the real question is: Why are you surfing on Terry Goodkind's web site? :)

Michael

Anonymous said...

I read this quote a while back and I had to laugh. I worked in a bookstore for 7 years as a manager of one of the largest B&N stores in the company. People who buy Terry Goodkind are [i]fantasy[/i] readers. Those readers also tend to read George R. R. Martin, Tad Williams, and Robert Jordan.

For Goodkind to say his readership is comprised of fiction readers and not fantasy readers is a huge error on his part. He obviously doesn't know his readership well or where his books sell out of in a bookstore. He probably [i]wishes[/i] however he was shelved in the same place as his beloved Ayn Rand, and that's the reason for the quote—merely his desire to be taken "seriously."

He fails to realize fantasy can be just as literary as normal fiction—sometimes more so.

.scott said...

Goodkind is a tool...nuff said.

Iosua said...

Lol, I'm a fan of the SOT series but I do admit that terry might have bit of an over-estimation of his audience(not in a bad sense of the word) but still....haha.

Anonymous said...

That man will never realise anything. Because he is a pretentios asshat with delusions of literary grandeur.

Dave R said...

Wow - having read barely half of that interview, I don't think I've come across anyone so conceited and arrogant. I gave my copies of his first three books to a charity shop a while back, but that snippet of his personality will ensure that none of his books darken my house again :)

brian said...

Wow, I actually started to read some of the interview, and in doing realized what a bad writer he really is. He can't even construct answers deaper than a fifth grader could. And speaking of young readers, if you have children, think about the answer to the first question about maps. I keep hearing the refrain from Dora the Explorer, "I'm the map, I'm the map, I'm the map."

tbit said...

If you look at any list of BFFs (big fat fantasy) you will find his books listed. i guess he just has to tell himself every day that he is a real writer instead of one who only writes specfic.

Brys said...

"I believe that what they’re really doing is reading to find reason for hope, to find strength. While a bad book leaves readers with a sense of hopelessness and despair, a good novel, through stories of values realized, of wrongs righted, can bring to readers a connection to the wonder of life. A good novel shows how life can and ought to be lived. It not only entertains but energizes and uplifts readers."

This made me laugh so hard - perhaps the worst definition of what a good book is I've ever seen. Not only does it contradict much of what he has said before (novels being about theme, plot and characterisation), it also suggests that any novel that isn't inherently vacuous and entirely divorced from reality (again ironic for its hypocrisy) is worthless. I expect that Goodkind has no time for authors such as Marquez, Rushdie, McEwan, Ishiguro, Saramago, even Dostoevsky, etc, who don't aim to "uplift" readers.

Gearoid said...

WTF..... Has he been smoking something? How could his books be considered anything other than fantasy?

Frankly, I couldn't be bothered to read his interview based on that quote alone, but maybe someone should introduce him to Margaret Atwood and they can discuss her non sci-fi books too.